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W e l c o m e   t o  . . .

Poetry Tree

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Haiku Is...

Japanese poetry. Haiku essentially captures an "aha" moment experienced --in the present-- by the poet and is shared with the reader so he or she can experience exactly what the poet felt at the time. In essence, the poet's experience and emotional reaction is recreated--not "explained" or "described" as with other forms of poetry.

Traditionally, haiku always referenced nature and was written in the specific form of three lines composed of five, seven, and five syllables, respectively.

Haiku Form

Translation

Haiku Today

*Source/read more at: www.toyomasu.com/haiku

The translation of Japanese haiku into English often skews the syllabication. Therefore, an original haiku by a Japanese Master Poet, such as Matuso Basho, may not contain exactly the 5/7/5 syllable count when translated into English. (See left sidebar)

In addition, the "rules" for writing haiku have continued to morph especially as the style migrated outside of Japan. Today, contemporary haiku is not limited to always referencing nature nor to the 5/7/5 syntax. This deviation from tradition is highly debated. Nonetheless, contemporary haiku continues to be recognized--and written--by many. (See right sidebar)


The train was coming;
I had a kiss all ready;
The train departed.
--Jean Baucomont 1920

A typhoon bears down
On the beach stands Ryoma,
arms folded
--Kinoshita Michiteru

The butterfly
caught in the windchimes
buries the yard with a single leaf
--Paul Kent, NC Native

--lagoon at sunrise--
the shadow
 chases its pelican
--Kaye Linden

no wind
even the dog's bark drops
at its mouth
--d.e. connelly

 


Red Pepper Pods!
Add wings to them,
And they are dragonflies.
--Basho

Don't worry, spiders,
I keep house
 casually.
--Issa

All the time I pray to Buddha
I keep on
killing mosquitoes.
--Issa

First autumn morning:
the mirror I stare into
shows my father's face.
--Kijo

I kill an ant
and realize my 3 children
have been watching.
--Shuson

 

Ocean Isle Beach, NC

Last page update: 9/21/18

Contact Us:
poets@poetryrevisited.org

Our Poetry Tree has moved from the Rourk Library in Shalllotte to the Southwest Branch Library in Carolina Shores. The display will still contain traditional and contemporary haiku (Japanese style poems) as well as short poems (approximately 12 lines or less) in a myriad of styles. (If you're not familiar with haiku, scroll down for more information and examples of this unique style of poetry.)

Poetry Tree: Haiku and Short Poems

We invite you to stop by the display and take a moment to read a few haiku and/or short poems.
You never know when one will simply make your day or you'll be inspired to begin your own poetry-writing journey!

In 2017, we changed our Haiku Tree into a Poetry Tree to acccommodate more poetry styles.
Here are two "before/after" pictures of our display.

Contemporary
Haiku

Traditional
Haiku

2015 Poetry Revisited;
 All Rights Reserved

None of the poetry on this site may be reproduced in any way
without prior written approval from the author.

Site design by MJ O'Leary
WebStudio 5.0

Original "Haiku Tree" in Springtime

New "Poetry Tree" in Autumn

2015 Poetry Revisited;
 All Rights Reserved

None of the poetry on this site may be reproduced in any way
without prior written approval from the author.

Site design by MJ O'Leary
WebStudio 5.0

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